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University Libraries

University Libraries

University Libraries

Collections & Artworks

COLLECTIONS

El PomarPENROSE COLLECTION

Lower Level

In recognition of the generous support from the El Pomar Foundation, this display acknowledges the    legacy of Julie and Spencer Penrose and the El Pomar Foundation at the University of Denver's libraries.

 

 

 

 

FINE PRESS & ARTISTS' BOOKS COLLECTION 

 

Artists Books - Upper Level, Gottesfeld Room (Room 313)

GottesfeldThis collection highlights the beauty of the book-as-object with examples of fine press books that emphasize hand-printing techniques and artists' books that move beyond the traditional codex format to challenge our notions of the book. Whenever possible, we collect books that intersect with other special collections such as cookery and books on books. Within this collection are closely-related collections of miniature books, broadsides, and Shakespeariana.

Broadsides – Displayed on the walls of all three levels

Find out more about our broadsides in Special Collections and strategies on how to locate a broadside in our library catalog.

Other works – Contact Special Collections and Archives

 

SKI COLLECTIONski

Upper Level, Quinette Family Reading Room (Room 302)

A rare archive of over 1600 books, periodicals, photographs, memorabilia, and related material on the history and evolution of skiing from its origins in Scandinavia through to its development as a sport in the Alps at the end of the 19th Century and into the 20th Century. The collection contains original editions of books from over 20 countries published between 1558 and the present day. The main focus of the collection is on skiing as a sport and the development of skiing technique with works from the beginning of the 20th Century by Allais, Caulfield, Lunn, Richardson, Rickmers, Schneider, Zdarsky and by virtually all of the sport's creators and commentators.

 

ARTWORKS

BIRDS OF HAPPINESSCrane

Dee Clements

Bronze, 1995 (recast 2009 under    direction of the artist)

Upper Level, Gilbert Frank/Recent Grad Study Area

Gift in memory of Stuart B. James, Professor of English 1957-86 and Professor Emeritus from 1986 and presented by Jean & Barbara James.

Jean James, retired librarian and DU alumna, selected a nature-inspired sculpture to commemorate her husband Prof. Stuart James, English professor, avid birder and nature lover. In early 1995, Jean recruited sculptor Dee Clements from a bronze foundry in Loveland, Colorado to construct this community memory.

 

EAGLE CATCHEReagle

George Carlson

Bronze, 1973

Upper Level, Gilbert Frank/Recent Grad Study Area

Gift in memory of Martin J. and Mary Anne O'Fallon and presented by the Colorado Business Pioneers O'Fallon Trust.

Eagles appear often in George Carlson's sculpture from the late 1960s onward. He bases these complex compositions on careful studies of the birds in the wild. The eagle's graceful flight and its role in Native American traditions are delicately represented in this work. The prize-winning Eagle Catcher is often cited as one of the artist's most significant early bronzes.

 

PORTRAIT OF GOVERNOR MORRISON SHAFROTHShafroth

Upper Level, Study Room 310

The portrait of former Colorado Governor Morrison Shafroth was provided by donor Frank Shafroth '49, Morrison's grandson. Morrison served as a University of Denver Trustee from 1939 - 1963.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SKYFALL POSTER 

Upper Level, Study Room 316 skyfall

Alumnus William P. Dunham, Jr., BA '72 and MPA '75, donated this poster to commemorate the new Anderson Academic Commons on behalf of SAE Colorado Zeta Fraternity. A viewing of Skyfall was one of the grand opening week events in the new building.

 

 

 

 

PHOTOGRAPHS BY RONALD WOHLAUER 

Upper Level, Wohlauer Teleconferencing Room (Room 325)

Wohlauer Photos

 

The six photographs hanging in the Wohlauer Teleconferencing Room were taken by Ronald Wohlauer and given for display in the room named initially in memory of his sister and eventually in honor of the whole Wohlauer family.

 

 

 

 

 

TRIPLE MOBIUS Triple Mobius

Deborah Howard, Professor of Painting,        School of Art & Art History

Acrylics, ink on paper, 1999

Main Level, Crossley Research Center    (Room 240)

"In mathematics, the Möbius is the symbol for infinity....I feel that the Möbius resembles the process of doing research in a library where one can discover a path that will lead from one idea to another on a journey that is cyclical and unending." - Deborah Howard

 

ARACHNE Arachne

Deborah Howard, Professor of Painting,        School of Art & Art History

Acrylics, ink on paper, 1999

Main Stairwell

"I feel it is appropriate that this painting has found a home in the library. Like a labyrinth, a library is a place where one can still wander and discover unexpected ideas that might lead to other ideas and new realizations." - Deborah Howard

 

MATH ART Math Art

Stan Gudder, John Evans Professor of Mathematics

2013

Main Level, Math Center (Room 277)

Artist Stan Gudder researches mathematical physics and the foundations of quantum mechanics for his day job, but also has been producing computer art for over 40 years. He calls his work Math Art and describes it as graphic art based on mathematical and scientific principles. Prof. Gudder comments, "The works that I present are a very small part of an infinite universe and a form of electronic media that is a synthesis of art, mathematics, computer science and experimentation."

 

PORTRAIT OF ARCHIBALD CROSSLEY  Crossley

Main Level, Crossley Research Center (Room 240)

University of Denver alumna Helen Crossley '48 provided funding for the Crossley Research Center and named the Center after herself and her father, Archibald, who is pictured in the portrait.

 

 

 

 

 

BULLET PROOF CAMPUS ART 

Charles O. Perry 

Steel, 1973

Carnegie Green outside Anderson Academic Commons 

Bullet ProofCharles O. Perry (1929-2011) was a sculptor, designer, and architect well known for large-scale sculptures inspired by geometry. According to the story, the title of the artwork was a joke, purportedly because someone, fearful of criticism from the students, advised Perry to design something 'bulletproof'.